• Customer purchasing lumber at a TRP warehouse.
  • Greenhouse project build with lumber from a TRP deconstruction project.
  • Banding lumber from a residential deconstruction project.
  • Deconstruction worker on a rooftop in San Francisco.

Since 1993:

•TRP has deconstructed over 2,000 houses and other buildings to salvage reusable materials.

•TRP has diverted over 350,000 tons of reusable materials from landfills.

•TRP has trained over 500 unemployed, underemployed and disadvantaged workers.

•TRP has trained over 71 contractors, who in turn create needed construction jobs.

Since 1993, architects, contractors and building owners have relied on TRP to keep reusable and recyclable building materials out of overburdened landfills. By de-constructing (instead of demolishing) a building, TRP is able to salvage up to 80 percent of the materials and channel them back into the marketplace through donations and sales at its network of retail outlets.


TRP offers the following green services and products:

Building materials donation and deconstruction • Building materials salvage • Building materials distribution • Great deals on reclaimed building materials and lumber • Project management • Training • Consulting services • Reuse and recycling plans

The Latest TRP News:

By Kristin Williams

Top 10 Green Building Trends for 2010By Arthur Renaud

As 2009 and the decade ended, and 2010 began, numerous magazine, newspaper and online articles recapped recent milestones in the building industry and predicted green-building trends for the coming year.

By Cheryl Sharp

Reuse and recycle -- two words that seem to confuse people. Here's the difference: Reuse is any activity that lengthens the life of an item. Recycling is the reprocessing of an item into a new raw material.

 

Some of the reasons why the reuse of building materials is so important:

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